Four Environmental Benefits of Electric Heat

Posted on February 26, 2018March 4, 2018Leave a commentPosted in Alternative Energy, Electric, Sustainable

Throughout the year, every home and business requires heat in order to ensure the comfort of inhabitants. With an emphasis on protecting and caring for the environment, it is important to acknowledge the impact of energy usage in all that we do. When it comes to heating, there are a variety of possible options to consider. Presented here are four reasons why electric heating is the most environmentally responsible decision.

First, electric heating has often been considered expensive, but this is entirely untrue. In fact, electric heating is better for the consumer and the environment in several ways. First, electric heat is convenient and cost-effective because it is provided through heat pumps. These versatile machines are used not only for heating but for cooling as well, which eliminates the need for other devices and reduces equipment costs.

Second, electric heating does not pollute the environment. Other heating sources such as gas, coal, or wood-burning cause pollution both inside the home and out. Smoke and fumes from other types of heat sources can be damaging to the interior and exterior of the home or business. Chimneys and ventilation systems can become backed up and cause blockages or even fire, but these are not necessary for electric heating. In fact, there are plenty of options for electric garage heaters with thermostats that require little to no maintenance at all. Electric heating is environmentally friendly because it does not create emissions and leaves the inside and surrounding outdoor air clear. Electric heating does not produce dangerous carbon monoxide, and leaves no build-up of debris like other heating sources.

Third, there is no additional usage of environmental resources. Electric heating does not require a burden to get coal, wood or gas delivered or cut for the home. No gasoline or vehicles are needed to get electric heat from one place to another – it is already pre-wired in existing buildings or can be plugged in for an additional supplement. This eliminates environmental waste and resources needed for delivery, cutting or even mining. It is accessible for people with all types of ability levels since no active process is required to heat your home or work. This makes electric heating safer for many groups of people who may have difficulty with movement, adjusting or operating a pilot light, or lifting heavy loads of wood or coal. With electric heat, all you need to do is simply flip the switch or adjust the thermostat!

A fourth reason electric heating is better for the environment is that it is not wasteful. The efficiency of electric heating is not shared by any other heat source or process. All the energy that is put into making electric heat returns directly as output. There is no heat wasted or over-produced because electric heating is regulated by thermostats which monitor temperature. These thermostats are effective at controlling the amount of heat created and are helpful for ensuring a space is kept at a comfortable temperature.

Sustainable Wood Harvesting

Posted on February 1, 2018March 4, 2018Leave a commentPosted in Natural Resources, Sustainable

Forested areas that provide wood are resources that must be carefully managed to ensure a continuing supply for the current population, as well as an increasing population in the future. Harvesting wood to ensure sustainability requires a careful evaluation of current resources and accurate growth data on various types of trees, in order to determine how much can reasonably be used in the present and what amounts need to be replenished for future use.

The Growing Move Toward Sustainability

A “sustainable yield” of a natural asset like wood from forests is defined as the amount that can be extracted without diminishing the base of capital itself. That is, you should only be removing an amount that can be restored within a reasonable amount of time for continued use. In the case of trees, the time frame can be significant, particularly when calculating woods that take many years to develop.

Choosing Sustainable Woods

Choosing woods for building needs depends on the type of wood used and the growth rate of the trees in question. For example, oak and hickory trees take hundreds of years to achieve full growth, although many are harvested before their maturity. In contrast, birch and pine take one-third to one-half as long as oak to reach maturity. Cherry trees and maple trees have fairly short lifespans. These trees have varying color tones, which may go in and out of style. However, if you choose woods that have a shorter lifespan, they will be able to be regrown more quickly. Bamboo, which is actually a grass, not a tree, is a versatile and sustainable wood that can be used for many different building purposes that does not deplete the hardwood forests.

Improving Forest Sustainability In the Future

Forestry is a long-term enterprise that requires considerable thought about the market needs and prices of today, as well as the preserving a dependable store of wood for the future of quality home furnishings. As the forestry and wood industries go forward, greater emphasis is being placed on composite products that reduce the amount of wood that is used. Countries are putting more thought into how forest lands are used for recreation and have begun instituting programs and building strategies that minimize the damage to forests. In addition, conservation services are working in tandem with owners of forestland to implement restoration programs that will help to maintain adequate tree growth for the future years.

As the public becomes more educated on the importance of forest areas in the health and well being of the human population, sustainability in building will be the norm, rather than a new idea. Individuals who are currently involved in building properties can advance the progress of sustainable construction practices by taking active steps to choose woods that easily replenish the supply of usable trees in the environment. These steps will help maintain a healthy supply of wood for the generations to come.